Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

November 21 2014

Echtes VGA für den Raspberry Pi

Fand ich immer schade, dass der Pi nur HDMI kann - aber jetzt kann er auch VGA, und all die alten Monitore sind schön für Baustelzwecke zu verwenden. Nötig ist allerdings ein B+ oder A+, weil das Widerstandsnetzwerk für die D/A - Wandlung (3x6bit = 262144 Farben) eine Menge Ports braucht. Die verwendeten Ports sind nicht veränderbar, deswegen fehlen leider sowohl I2C als auch die serielle Schnittstelle.

<!-- s9ymdb:960 -->

Obwohl Gert van Loo in seiner Doku zu dieser Erweiterung schreibt "If you look
very closely there is a slight pixel crawl", sehe ich da nichts - einwandfreies Bild!

<!-- s9ymdb:961 -->
"Echtes VGA für den Raspberry Pi" vollständig lesen

November 19 2014

Amateur Hour with the Best Friends Learning Gang

Awesomeness in the Making – it’s the Holiday Make-A-Thon

holidayMakeathonBanner

Since 2010 Milwaukee Makerspace has partnered with Bucketworks to host a Holiday Make-A-Thon on the Friday following Thanksgiving. What do we do at the Make-A-Thon? We make things of course, but more importantly we make things for the holidays and help children of all ages make holiday items for gifts, decorations or donations.

Typically this event was held at Bucketworks. In 2013 Bucketworks was moving into their new space so the event was held at the Milwaukee Makerspace in Bayview.

The question for 2014 is “where are we going to hold the Holiday Make-A-Thon” or is it Make-A-Thons?

The answer is we can have multiple Make-A-Thons at different locations, hosted by different groups on the same day.

Please join us for the Holiday Make-A-Thon happening at the Milwaukee Makerspace and the Mini Make-A-Thon happening at UberDork Cafe on Friday November 28th, 2014 from 1:00pm to 6:00pm.

This event is competely free and we ask for donations to help cover the cost of materials.

Activities
Some of these are tentative and will rely on people to volunteer to make them happen!

  • Decorate a laser-cut ornament
  • Design a laser-cut ornament
  • Learn to solder a tie-pin
  • Design & 3D print a cookie cutter
  • Make a necklace / bracelet
  • Make a rose pin
  • Decorate your own gift wrapping paper
  • Fold a paper diamond ornament
  • Make a woodcut print

Refreshments
Want to bring something delicious to share? Please do!

  • Cookies
  • Pie
  • Leftovers!
Felting and Natural Dying with Cochineal and Indigo

SIGBOT meeting: Thursday, November 20, 2014 @ 19:00

This month for SIGBOT, we’ll be having a special guest lecturer. One
of our own members, Darold Higa, will be presenting research he did
where he used genetic algorithm techniques to simulate interactions
between agents in settings that resemble our human history. The
abstract:


=====
Multi-Agent Virtual Histories: Disaggregating International Relations
Phenomena into Networks of Microinteractions

Concerns over the environment, terrorism, ethnic violence and state
disintegration have placed greater emphasis on exploring the possible
connections between resource scarcity and inter-group violence. The
wide range of divergent outcomes resulting from resource scarcity
suggests that the ideational context of resource scarcity is critical
in modeling this relationship. Developing an adequate model of the
relationship between scarcity and violence must therefore contain
elements that can reflect the origins, development and proliferation
of ideas and alternative economic strategies in order to adequately
explain real-world divergence in outcomes. Scarcity as a Complex
Adaptive System (SCAS) is one such model. SCAS uses an agent-based
model featuring cognitively complex agents on a differentiated,
three-dimensional landscape to explore the relationship between
resource scarcity and inter-group violence. In order to demonstrate
the efficacy of SCAS requires translating the model into a computer
simulation known as agentLand. AgentLand features adaptive agents that
learn experientially via Holland’s Learning Classifier System, learn
socially through communication and innovate through random strategy
generation. The resulting virtual histories created by agentLand show
that ideas, geography, density and communication are important, and
the proliferation of different strategies across a landscape of
adaptive agents can create a wide range of outcomes, paralleling
diversity found in the real world. Preliminary results show that by
using an ensemble of virtual histories, agentLand is able to generate
plausible virtual scenarios. Most importantly, this research opens the
door to a different way of conceptualizing and
modeling complex macro-level events as networks of microinteractions.
=====

So, what does this have to do with robotics? Darold is interested in
taking the techniques he used in his research and applying them to the
design of robots. After he gives his talk, we’ll have a discussion
about how we could go about doing that.

SIGBOT is the Special Interest Group for Robotics. We meet every 3rd
Thursday of the month at Pumping Station: One. We talk about robotics
topics and we design and build our own robots.

November 18 2014

20141118 Møterom flyttet..

Vi har blitt midlertidig flyttet til Møterom 1 i kjelleren, siden Digitalt Verksted fremdeles er under oppussing.

November 17 2014

December 2014 Book Club

Yes! Friday, 12th December, at 19:30, we’ll meet for the last time this year. We’ll reminisce about our favourite books of the year gone by, and discuss this months book; chosen by random number generator – Gateway by Frederik Pohl.

Gateway opened on all the wealth of the Universe…and on reaches of unimaginable horror. When prospector Robinette Broadhead went out to Gateway on the Heechee spacecraft, he decided he would know which was the right mission to make him his fortune. Three missions later, now famous and permanently rich, Rob Broadhead has to face what happened to him and what he is…in a journey into himself as perilous and even more horrifying than the nightmare trip through the interstellar void that he drove himself to take!

November 16 2014

Cryptographic hardware tokens for more secure email

November 15 2014

Science Champion Medals

We were itching to give our laser cutter a good trial run, when our friends over at Science Hack Day Dublin need some medals created. We started off with their logo and reworked to make it more laser cutter friendly. Check out the results below.  If your interested in laser cutting drop by the space sometime.

 

IMG_20141113_220949

For a bit of fun, we also made a large sign. Namit is very happy with his work.

IMG_20141113_222654

Check out the video below to see how they are made,

November 14 2014

11-22-2014 Incident Response & Network Intrusion

Incident & Network Intrusion response  Bryan B will be giving a presentation on incident  and network intrusion response  practices and procedures. Also recommended  best practices, tools and sources for study and research.               Cyber Pizza Cafe – 2PM 1200 S Federal Hwy Dania Beach, FL

Dynamic Sculpture – Update 2

The first update can be found here.

The dynamic sculpture is affectionately called “Douglas” till we come up with a better name. Lance, Chris, and I have been working on different pieces of the project concurrently.

Chris has been designing the slave controller PCB. Each PCB will have a PIC micro controller, which will drive (2) stepper motor through (2) ULN2003A chips. The PIC controllers will communicate to a  chipKIT™ WiFire over SPI. The WiFire has built in SD Card and WiFi. Since Douglas will be hung in an atrium, this allows us to send new animations wirelessly to a SD Card.

Lance has been working on the PIC firmware and the communication protocol. The firmware interprets the “G-Code” like commands and drives each stepper at the specified acceleration and velocity.

I have been designing the motor mount and frame in Inventor. A few pics below.

mount_1 mount_2 mount_3

The bent acrylic mount will be mounted on aluminum extrusions. The limit switch has been integrated into the mount as well. I built the first prototype a couple of days ago.

IMG_0788

Next, I will create a bending jig to replicate the mount accurately. Additionally, we will be doing some measurements to figure out power consumption. Currently, it looks like we will need two dedicated 120V, 20 amps circuits. We would like to do some real world combined power consumption tests to see if we can lower that requirement.

Maker Art: (Another) Opening Tonight in Pilsen

DSC_6394 group

My knitted-circuit artwork, Electronic Damask, was in a gallery show, NoFi, at Chicago Artists Coalition, October 24 – Nov 13. The piece was a collaborative effort, put together through the volunteer efforts of close to two dozen PS:One members. PS:One really represented at the Oct 24 opening, and I managed to drag most of us in front of the camera for a group photo with the artwork. (Thanks to Everett for the photo!)

If you missed the fun that night, you’re in luck. Electronic Damask has already been tapped for another show, and with an opening tonight in Pilsen, from 6 – 10pm.

This show should be of particular interest to PS:One members. It’s called Technologic and it “celebrates making art through technology”. It features some amazing stuff made with 3D printers, LCD screens, CNC watercolor painting, and of course a certain knitted e-textile.

The gallery, Chicago Art Department, is located at 1932 W Halsted in East Pilsen’s Chicago Art District (#8 Halsted bus runs right past it). Tonight’s opening coincides with the district’s 2nd Fridays gallery night, so there will be other openings all over the neighborhood.

You can find preview photos of the show on the facebook page. Full info is below. The show runs until December 6.

TECHNOLOGIC
curated by Chuck Przybyl

Friday, Nov 14, 6-10pm

An exhibition that celebrates making art through technology. Work featured will include robotic drawing, 3D printing, laser cutting, textile circuitry, algorithmic art, image slicing, circuit bending, and prosthetics. Although often unsung – artists having access to new technologies has historically pushed and propelled creative endeavors. The exciting new technologies of today have been pushing the overall culture of DIY and propelling the Maker Movement. This is a participatory culture that embraces tools and empowers masses of people to innovate and create. Technologic explores and showcases not only how art is currently being produced with new tools, but how fringe technologies can be used in progressive and cutting edge ways.
Viewers also have an opportunity to “go deeper” to gain further insight through series of discussions and workshops as well information on the processes at the exhibit.

Technologic is curated by Chuck Przybyl for Chicago Art Department.
Artists: Tom Burtonwood, Christopher Furman, Harvey Moon, Luftwerk, Jesse Seay, Nathan Davis, Christopher Breedlove, Christian Oiticica, Leo Selvaggio, Antoine Kattar, and Russell Prather

Opening Reception Nov. 14 – 6-10 PM
3D Printing Workshop with Tom Burtonwood Saturday Nov – 15 – 2-5 PM
Panel Discussion  Saturday Nov – 22 – 2-5 PM
Chicago Art Department – 1932 S. Halsted St. Suite 100 Chicago IL 60622 USA

Movie Night: The Pirate Bay Away From Keyboard

It’s Movie Night time! This is a documentary about the trial of the Pirate Bay founders in Sweden.

From http://www.tpbafk.tv/the-film/:
“It’s the day before the trial starts. Fredrik packs a computer into a rusty old Volvo.Along with his Pirate Bay co-founders, he faces $13 million in damage claims to Hollywood in a copyright infringement case. Fredrik is on his way to install a new computer in the secret server hall. This is where the world’s largest file sharing site is hidden…”

When:
Friday September 5, 7:30 PM-9:30 PM
Doors open at 7. Feel free to BYOB. Afterwards there will be discussion.

Where:
PS:One Lounge

Trailer:

Click here to view the embedded video.

November 13 2014

What is a trolley? (link)

I recently found a great set of posts about what a trolley is and how they work at Nathan Vass' website.  The short version is that a trolley is an electric bus that gets its power from overhead lines.  There are many advantages to using a bus with rubber tires over a train (can change lanes, can avoid obstacles, climb hills without wheel-spin) and many advantages to using an electric bus over a diesel bus, the main reason being torque to climb the hills of San Francisco.

Part i is here
Part ii is here

I originally became interested in the topic last year when I visited San Francisco.  There were many things I liked about the city that appealed to different interests of mine (city planning, green spaces, diverse cultures), but one of the things that stuck out to me was the infrastructure for the trolley system.  This was not something I had expected.

edit_IMG_2122

When you look up while downtown, just below the common sight of power lines at the top of the utility poles, you see what looks at first like a rats nest of electric wires.  This is especially so around intersections in the road.  But upon further examination, patterns emerge.  I noticed that the wires were running in pairs of parallel tracks, and where one track crossed another, one of the pairs would have some extra hardware.

edit_Muni_trolleybus_wires_at_Haight

I only spent a moment trying to figure out what they could be used for when one of the Muni buses (a trolley) passed me on the street.  These are quiet, exhaust-smell free giants of public transportation that I was instantly in love with.  And this post isn't about public transportation overall, but if you need an explanation as to why it is good and how a bus can greatly reduce congestion, this GIF explains it beautifully.

tumblr_mvqe8gUMzP1qzft56o1_500

November 11 2014

Hack Holyoke

November 10 2014

NERP Tonight — The MinnowBoard from Intel, and BeagleBone Black Internals

NERP Tonight — The MinnowBoard from Intel, and BeagleBone Black Internals

NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer
and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One
in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping
Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago.

The MinnowBoard is one of the newer open (or open-ish) hardware and software single board computers. The Minnowboard showcases Intel’s Atom processor. The audience is the Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone crowd, but the feature set and price puts the MinnowBoard in a different class. Drew got his last week and has gotten a good overview of the system. He’ll share his findings with us tonight.

The BeagleBone is a fast-moving software project where major pieces of the system are under constant revision. I’ve been digging around the BeagleBone Black’s i/o system and playing with some configuration options. Tonight I’ll show a couple of sources of tools and code that I’ve found useful.

Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at

#meetup_oembed .mu_clearfix:after { visibility: hidden; display: block; font-size: 0; content: " "; clear: both; height: 0; }* html #meetup_oembed .mu_clearfix, *:first-child+html #meetup_oembed .mu_clearfix { zoom: 1; }#meetup_oembed { background:#eee;border:1px solid #ccc;padding:10px;-moz-border-radius:3px;-webkit-border-radius:3px;border-radius:3px;margin:0; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; }#meetup_oembed h3 { font-weight:normal; margin:0 0 10px; padding:0; line-height:26px; font-family:Georgia,Palatino,serif; font-size:24px }#meetup_oembed p { margin: 0 0 10px; padding:0; line-height:16px; }#meetup_oembed img { border:none; margin:0; padding:0; }#meetup_oembed a, #meetup_oembed a:visited, #meetup_oembed a:link { color: #1B76B3; text-decoration: none; cursor: hand; cursor: pointer; }#meetup_oembed a:hover { color: #1B76B3; text-decoration: underline; }#meetup_oembed a.mu_button { font-size:14px; -moz-border-radius:3px;-webkit-border-radius:3px;border-radius:3px;border:2px solid #A7241D;color:white!important;text-decoration:none;background-color: #CA3E47; background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #ca3e47, #a8252e); background-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, left bottom, left top, color-stop(0, #a8252e), color-stop(1, #ca3e47));disvplay:inline-block;padding:5px 10px; }#meetup_oembed a.mu_button:hover { color: #fff!important; text-decoration: none; }#meetup_oembed .photo { width:50px; height:50px; overflow:hidden;background:#ccc;float:left;margin:0 5px 0 0;text-align:center;padding:1px; }#meetup_oembed .photo img { height:50px }#meetup_oembed .number { font-size:18px; }#meetup_oembed .thing { text-transform: uppercase; color: #555; }

NERP – Not Exclusively Raspberry Pi

Chicago, IL
275 members

NERP is Not Exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station One in Chicago. (Chicago’s oldest and finest hackerspace.) NERP…

Next Meetup

Bring questions, demos, personal research, etc. to share.

Monday, Nov 10, 2014, 7:00 PM
6 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

and

http://pumpingstationone.org/

Doors open at 6:30pm. The next meeting is November 10th, 2014.

NERP is free and open to the public.
Ed Bennett ed @ kinetics and electronics com
Tags: electronics, embedded, NERP, Open Source,
raspberry pi, hackerspace, Beagle Bone, Element14, Pumping
Station One

Ausprobieren mit Pygame, RasPi und Pollin LCD

Hier so ein paar Vorübungen zu einer GUI auf dem Pi.

<!-- s9ymdb:953 -->

Man weiss ja immer nicht so richtig, welche Schriften und Farben man nehmen soll. Weil die Pygame-Lib Truetype unterstützt, ist z.B. dafont.com eine gute Adresse, diese Schrift geht gut als Monospaced.

Bei der Suche nach angenehmen Farbpaletten hilft Adobe Color CC.

Neuer Raspberry - auch diesmal eine gute Entscheidung

Es gibt einen weiteren Pi mit abgespecktem Hardwareumfang, den A+. Was ich bei den Entscheidungen für den Pi B, A, B+ und jetzt A+ besonders schätze: Keine geänderten Chips, alle Software läuft wie gehabt. Die Macher vermeiden, die Hardware Base in dutzende Versionen zu zersplittern und machen so den Umgang mit den Boards besonders für Einsteiger einfach, der Support durch die riesige User Base bleibt einheitlich und passend. (Power User, die Grafik- oder CPU-leistung, LAN-Bandbreite oder viel RAM brauchen, kaufen halt was anderes)

November 09 2014

The metal lathe’s shiny new cover

The lathe in its new cover near its friend the tiny geodesic dome.

The lathe in its new cover near its friend the tiny geodesic dome.


A few of TOG’s members got together and put a metal lathe in the workshop. The workshop is the most appropriate place for it, but also the place it’s most likely to gather dust (from other people’s projects, the lathe will get plenty of use). So the first project for the lathe was to build it a cover.

We made use of some of Cheryl’s leftover vinyl from another project, so that visitors could ooooh and ahhhh at the lathe beneath the cover (ooooh, we should join this hackerspace with its cool tools). The sides and skirt were made from leftover skin from TOGduck. The first side seam was done inside out, so rather than redoing it, we decided to trim it in black bias binding for that super cool industrial look. There’s a velcro loop that hooks around the display to stop the cover slipping off at that side. A corner built into the cover keeps it from slipping from the other side. It’s not very long at the back as the rear of the lathe is pretty much a flat panel, so that’s not going to get gummed up with dust.

Myself and Becky were very pleased with how this turned out. We learned that machine sewing vinyl is hard. The vinyl sticks to the presser foot so we had to turn it over, but it also isn’t gripped by the feed dogs. We had to resort to a guide/pull team effort, with me guiding the material through the machine, and Becky pulling the fabric gently through from behind the machine. Remarkably, we didn’t bend the sewing machine needle, but we’re not about to test our vinyl skills again soon :)

Oh, and as well as a lathe cover, TOG got a metal lathe recently :) Keep an eye out to see what we get up to with it.

Red velcro tie, brightly coloured so you don't forget to undo it when removing the cover.

Red velcro tie, brightly coloured so you don’t forget to undo it when removing the cover.

MegaMax is Too Noisy

As part of my effort to reduce the noise and vibration in the Y axis, I am going to try using a screw drive instead of the 5mm pitch belt.  I rescued a screw drive assembly from a big XY table but it uses a 200W servomotor for which I have neither power supply nor drive electronics.  Never fear!  The motor was a NEMA-34 size, so I designed an adapter to mount the NEMA-23 stepper that MegaMax uses in the NEMA-34 motor mount.  Next I needed a shaft coupler- the screw has a 9mm diameter attachment and the NEMA-23 motor has a 1/4″ shaft.

Adapter plate on NEMA-23 motor

Adapter plate on NEMA-23 motor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I used DesignSpark Mechanical to design the motor mount adapter and  flexible shaft coupler.  I uploaded the motor adapter to Thingiverse (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:526424) and it proved surprisingly popular so I designed another that adapts a NEMA-23 mount for a NEMA-17 motor (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:526443).  I had to make two attempts at the flexible shaft coupler- the first design proved a little too springy and flexible, so I tried again with a more beefy design.  It turns out it is pretty easy to design this sort of thing in DSM.  I probably spent 30 minutes on the first one and about 10 minutes on the second one.

I sliced in Cura because Slic3r was having some problems.  The prints look a little rough because of all the support material required to print the springs, but they work fine.

Flexible shaft couplers

Flexible shaft couplers- not-so-springy and super-springy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adapter and shaft coupler on motor

Adapter and shaft coupler on motor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ll post an update when I get the screw mounted on the machine.

 

 

Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.